CHARGED WITH CRIME?  CALL TODAY TO SPEAK TO AN ATTORNEY 303-698-1603
MCCLUSKEY LAW ​ OFFICE

​CRIMINAL DEFENSE 303-698-1603



MCCLUSKEY LAW OFFICE is a criminal defense law office dedicated to protecting the rights of individuals charged with crimes.  M. E. McCluskey, Esq. is available to represent clients charged with  FELONIES and or MISDEMEANORS in Arvada, Aurora, Bennett, Beyers, Boulder, Breckenridge, Brighton, Broomfield, Castle Rock, Centennial, Cherry Creek, Denver, Edgewater, Engelwood, Federal Heights, Fort Collins, Fort Lupton, Fort Morgan Greeley, Greenwood Village, Frederick, Highlands Ranch, Kiowa, Lakewood, Lakeside, Littleton, Lochbuie, Lodo, Longmont, Louisville, Loveland, Northglenn, Parker, Platteville, Sheridan, Strasburg, Thornton, Telluride, Vail, Watkins, Westminster, Wheat Ridge, Windsor, Front Range communities and ADAMS, ARAPAHOE, BOULDER, BROOMFIELD, CLEAR CREEK, DENVER, DOUGLAS, EL PASO, GILPIN, JEFFERSON, LARIMER, and WELD counties.

ParoleHearings of the Parole Board. The Parole Board's primary responsibility is to conduct inmate release hearings. Parole Board members conduct four types of hearings: parole application interviews – the board, via a single member, considers an inmate's parole application, interviews the inmate, decides whether the inmate should be released on parole, and determines the conditions of parole. This personal interview may be a face-to-face interview, a live telecommunication interview, or a live telephonic interview at the board’s discretion. Release hearings are held at the institution or in the community where the offender is physically incarcerated. If the board member decides to release the offender, the approval by signature is required by an additional board member; full board reviews– the board meets as a full board to consider all cases involving a violent crime, cases with a history of violence, and all other matters recommended for full board review by board members conducting the release hearing. Four board members constitute a quorum and four affirmative votes are necessary to grant parole; rescission hearings – the board, via a single member, may suspend an established parole release date upon receipt of information not previously considered by the board, or upon receipt of information reflecting improper conduct by the inmate including disciplinary violations. A rescission hearing is then held by a single board member to determine if a decision to parole should be rescinded prior to the inmate actually being released on parole; and revocation hearings – revocation hearings are held to determine whether parole should be revoked and whether the parolee should be returned to a DOC facility. A revocation hearing is conducted either by a single member of the Parole Board or by an Administrative Hearings Officer (AHO). The single board member or AHO conducting the hearing also makes the decision to revoke or not. The parole guidelines law also sets out nine mitigating factors the board may consider when deciding whether to parole an inmate: 1. the offender was a passive or minor participant in the crime; 2. the victim precipitated the crime or somehow provoked the incident; 3. there was substantial justification for the offense; 4. the crime was committed under duress or coercion; 5. the offender has no past record or a long crime-free period; 6. the offender voluntarily acknowledges wrongdoing; 7. the offender has family obligations and further incarceration would cause undue hardship on dependents; 
8. the rehabilitation of the offender would be enhanced by imposing a shorter period of incarceration; and ​ 9. the offender has attempted compensation to the victim.
The parole guidelines legislation lists 15 aggravating factors for the Parole Board to consider: 1. the offender inflicted serious bodily injury or a high degree of cruelty; 2. the offender was armed with deadly weapons; 3. the crime involved multiple victims; 4. the crime involved particularly vulnerable victims; 5. the victim was a judicial or law enforcement officer; 6. the offender displays a pattern of violent conduct; 7. the offender was on parole or probation for another felony at commission; 8. the offender was in confinement or on escape status at commission; 9. the offender induced others in commission of offense; 10. the offender took advantage of a position of trust; 11. the offender either paid to have the crime committed or was paid to commit the crime; 12. the crime was premeditated; 13. the crime was drug or contraband related; 14. the offender was on bond for a previous felony during commission; and 15. the offender has increasingly serious convictions, juvenile or adult. 

Prepared by Legislative Council Staff  2007


MCCLUSKEY LAW OFFICE is a criminal defense law office dedicated to protecting the rights of individuals charged with crimes.  M. E. McCluskey, Esq. is available to represent at a PAROLE REVOCATION HEARING for parolees charged with PAROLE VIOLATIONS  in Arvada, Aurora, Bennett, Beyers, Boulder, Breckenridge, Brighton, Broomfield, Castle Rock, Centennial, Cherry Creek, Denver, Edgewater, Engelwood, Federal Heights, Fort Collins, Fort Lupton, Fort Morgan Greeley, Greenwood Village, Frederick, Highlands Ranch, Kiowa, Lakewood, Lakeside, Littleton, Lochbuie, Lodo, Longmont, Louisville, Loveland, Northglenn, Parker, Platteville, Sheridan, Strasburg, Thornton, Telluride, Vail, Watkins, Westminster, Wheat Ridge, Windsor, Front Range communities and ADAMS, ARAPAHOE, BOULDER, BROOMFIELD, CLEAR CREEK, DENVER, DOUGLAS, EL PASO, GILPIN, JEFFERSON, LARIMER, and WELD counties.

​Parole involves being monitored by a parole officer who has the authority to file a parole violation complaint based on a substantive offense or a less serious technical violation.